Leonhard Euler

Author: Ronald S. Calinger
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400866632
Size: 14.86 MB
Format: PDF
View: 87

This is the first full-scale biography of Leonhard Euler (1707–83), one of the greatest mathematicians and theoretical physicists of all time. In this comprehensive and authoritative account, Ronald Calinger connects the story of Euler's eventful life to the astonishing achievements that place him in the company of Archimedes, Newton, and Gauss. Drawing chiefly on Euler’s massive published works and correspondence, which fill more than eighty volumes so far, this biography sets Euler’s work in its multilayered context—personal, intellectual, institutional, political, cultural, religious, and social. It is a story of nearly incessant accomplishment, from Euler’s fundamental contributions to almost every area of pure and applied mathematics—especially calculus, number theory, notation, optics, and celestial, rational, and fluid mechanics—to his advancements in shipbuilding, telescopes, ballistics, cartography, chronology, and music theory. The narrative takes the reader from Euler’s childhood and education in Basel through his first period in St. Petersburg, 1727–41, where he gained a European reputation by solving the Basel problem and systematically developing analytical mechanics. Invited to Berlin by Frederick II, Euler published his famous Introductio in analysin infinitorum, devised continuum mechanics, and proposed a pulse theory of light. Returning to St. Petersburg in 1766, he created the analytical calculus of variations, developed the most precise lunar theory of the time that supported Newton’s dynamics, and published the best-selling Letters to a German Princess—all despite eye problems that ended in near-total blindness. In telling the remarkable story of Euler and how his achievements brought pan-European distinction to the Petersburg and Berlin academies of sciences, the book also demonstrates with new depth and detail the central role of mathematics in the Enlightenment. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Leonhard Euler

Author: R. Calinger
Publisher:
ISBN: 0691119279
Size: 19.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 11

This is the first full-scale biography of Leonhard Euler (1707–83), one of the greatest mathematicians and theoretical physicists of all time. In this comprehensive and authoritative account, Ronald Calinger connects the story of Euler’s eventful life to the astonishing achievements that place him in the company of Archimedes, Newton, and Gauss. Drawing chiefly on Euler’s massive published works and correspondence, which fill more than eighty volumes so far, this biography sets Euler’s work in its multilayered context—personal, intellectual, institutional, political, cultural, religious, and social. It is a story of nearly incessant accomplishment, from Euler’s fundamental contributions to almost every area of pure and applied mathematics—especially calculus, number theory, notation, optics, and celestial, rational, and fluid mechanics—to his advancements in shipbuilding, telescopes, ballistics, cartography, chronology, and music theory. The narrative takes the reader from Euler’s childhood and education in Basel through his first period in St. Petersburg, 1727–41, where he gained a European reputation by solving the Basel problem and systematically developing analytical mechanics. Invited to Berlin by Frederick II, Euler published his famous Introductio in analysin infinitorum, devised continuum mechanics, and proposed a pulse theory of light. Returning to St. Petersburg in 1766, he created the analytical calculus of variations, developed the most precise lunar theory of the time that supported Newton’s dynamics, and published the best-selling Letters to a German Princess—all despite eye problems that ended in near-total blindness. In telling the remarkable story of Euler and how his achievements brought pan-European distinction to the Petersburg and Berlin academies of sciences, the book also demonstrates with new depth and detail the central role of mathematics in the Enlightenment.

Leonhard Euler And The Bernoullis

Author: M. B. W. Tent
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9781439865484
Size: 14.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Leonhard Euler and the Bernoullis is a fascinating tale of the Bernoulli family and Euler's association with them. Successful merchants in the 16th and 17th centuries, the Bernoullis were driven out of Antwerp during the persecution of the Huguenots and settled first in Frankfurt, and then in Basel, where one of the most remarkable mathematical dynasties evolved with Jacob, Johann, and Daniel Bernoulli the most prominent among them. Euler, fortunate to have had Johann Bernoulli as a tutor, quickly rose to prominence in the academies of Berlin and St. Petersburg, and became the most prolific and profound mathematician that ever lived. The story of these remarkable men, their great ambitions and dedication to their science-often against parental authority-is skillfully told by the author. Refreshing fictional dialogue is interspersed throughout into an otherwise accurate historical scenario. The book is intended for the young adult audience of middle school and early high school ages, but surely will also appeal to a general audience, with or without mathematical background." --Walter Gautschi, Purdue University

Maxwell S Enduring Legacy

Author: Malcolm Longair
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107083691
Size: 12.46 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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An authoritative scientific history of a world-leading physics laboratory from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the present day.

The Prince Of Mathematics

Author: M. B. W. Tent
Publisher: A K Peters, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781568814551
Size: 10.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 63

Now in Paperback! The author narrates the life of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the 18th century mathematician, from his prodigious childhood to his extraordinary achievements that earned him the title Prince of Mathematics. Along the way, the author introduces her young readers to a different culture, the era of small states in Germany where advancement on merits, such as Gauss, was supported by enlightened rulers, competing for intellectual excellence and economic advantage through scientific progress in their small states.Based on extensive research of original and secondary sources, the author has created a historical narrative that will inspire young readers and even curious adults with a story full of human touch and personal achievement.

Classics Of Mathematics

Author: Ronald Calinger
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN: 002318342X
Size: 18.87 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 57

Appropriate for undergraduate and select graduate courses in the history of mathematics, and in the history of science. This edited volume of readings contains more than 130 selections from eminent mathematicians from A `h-mose' to Hilbert and Noether. The chapter introductions comprise a concise history of mathematics based on critical textual analysis and the latest scholarship. Each reading is preceded by a substantial biography of its author.

An Imaginary Tale

Author: Paul J. Nahin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400833892
Size: 15.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 15

Today complex numbers have such widespread practical use--from electrical engineering to aeronautics--that few people would expect the story behind their derivation to be filled with adventure and enigma. In An Imaginary Tale, Paul Nahin tells the 2000-year-old history of one of mathematics' most elusive numbers, the square root of minus one, also known as i. He recreates the baffling mathematical problems that conjured it up, and the colorful characters who tried to solve them. In 1878, when two brothers stole a mathematical papyrus from the ancient Egyptian burial site in the Valley of Kings, they led scholars to the earliest known occurrence of the square root of a negative number. The papyrus offered a specific numerical example of how to calculate the volume of a truncated square pyramid, which implied the need for i. In the first century, the mathematician-engineer Heron of Alexandria encountered I in a separate project, but fudged the arithmetic; medieval mathematicians stumbled upon the concept while grappling with the meaning of negative numbers, but dismissed their square roots as nonsense. By the time of Descartes, a theoretical use for these elusive square roots--now called "imaginary numbers"--was suspected, but efforts to solve them led to intense, bitter debates. The notorious i finally won acceptance and was put to use in complex analysis and theoretical physics in Napoleonic times. Addressing readers with both a general and scholarly interest in mathematics, Nahin weaves into this narrative entertaining historical facts and mathematical discussions, including the application of complex numbers and functions to important problems, such as Kepler's laws of planetary motion and ac electrical circuits. This book can be read as an engaging history, almost a biography, of one of the most evasive and pervasive "numbers" in all of mathematics. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.