Live Form

Author: Jenni Sorkin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226303253
Size: 11.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 56

Ceramics had a far-reaching impact in the second half of the twentieth century, as its artists worked through the same ideas regarding abstraction and form as those for other creative mediums. Live Form shines new light on the relation of ceramics to the artistic avant-garde by looking at the central role of women in the field: potters who popularized ceramics as they worked with or taught male counterparts like John Cage, Peter Voulkos, and Ken Price. Sorkin focuses on three Americans who promoted ceramics as an advanced artistic medium: Marguerite Wildenhain, a Bauhaus-trained potter and writer; Mary Caroline (M. C.) Richards, who renounced formalism at Black Mountain College to pursue new performative methods; and Susan Peterson, best known for her live throwing demonstrations on public television. Together, these women pioneered a hands-on teaching style and led educational and therapeutic activities for war veterans, students, the elderly, and many others. Far from being an isolated field, ceramics offered a sense of community and social engagement, which, Sorkin argues, crucially set the stage for later participatory forms of art and feminist collectivism.

Live Form

Author: Jenni Sorkin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226303116
Size: 16.39 MB
Format: PDF
View: 13

There has been a recent move in art history to reconsider craft practices in light of their relationships to the twentieth-century artistic avant-garde. This book focuses on (1) how ceramics culture evolved in the US when Bauhaus artists and designers emigrated from Europe during the run-up to WWII and (2) the understudied role of women artists in establishing ceramics as a sophisticated medium in the post-War years. No surprise: Black Mountain College is at the heart of much of it. Throughout, Sorkin s concern is how ceramics came to influence what is today called process art and performance (for example, Martha Rosler s video Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975). In both, the act of making or producing dominates as art over any resulting object. The book centers on three case studies of women who advanced ceramics as an artistic medium in this country: Marguerite Wildenhain, a Bauhaus artist who taught briefly at Black Mountain before starting an important pottery in California called Pond Farm and writing several influential books; M.C. Richards, who taught English at the University of Chicago and then literature and ceramics at Black Mountain College and who collaborated with Robert Rauschenberg, Merce Cunningham, and their coterie; and Susan Peterson, famous for teaching a ceramics class on TV in the 1960s, but who also taught in New York and then at Chinouard where she established their distinguished ceramics program and trained artists John Mason and Ken Price. Mason and Price went on to work almost exclusively in ceramics, but they used the material to make sculpture rather than functional pottery"

Live Form

Author: Jenni Sorkin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226303116
Size: 20.12 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 36

There has been a recent move in art history to reconsider craft practices in light of their relationships to the twentieth-century artistic avant-garde. This book focuses on (1) how ceramics culture evolved in the US when Bauhaus artists and designers emigrated from Europe during the run-up to WWII and (2) the understudied role of women artists in establishing ceramics as a sophisticated medium in the post-War years. No surprise: Black Mountain College is at the heart of much of it. Throughout, Sorkin s concern is how ceramics came to influence what is today called process art and performance (for example, Martha Rosler s video Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975). In both, the act of making or producing dominates as art over any resulting object. The book centers on three case studies of women who advanced ceramics as an artistic medium in this country: Marguerite Wildenhain, a Bauhaus artist who taught briefly at Black Mountain before starting an important pottery in California called Pond Farm and writing several influential books; M.C. Richards, who taught English at the University of Chicago and then literature and ceramics at Black Mountain College and who collaborated with Robert Rauschenberg, Merce Cunningham, and their coterie; and Susan Peterson, famous for teaching a ceramics class on TV in the 1960s, but who also taught in New York and then at Chinouard where she established their distinguished ceramics program and trained artists John Mason and Ken Price. Mason and Price went on to work almost exclusively in ceramics, but they used the material to make sculpture rather than functional pottery"

Revolution In The Making

Author: Paul Schimmel
Publisher: Skira - Berenice
ISBN: 8857230651
Size: 17.99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 62

Half theWorld traces the ways in which women artists deftly transformed the language of sculpture to invent radically new forms and processes that privileged studio practice, tactility and the artist's hand. The volume seeks to identify the multiple strains of proto-feminist practices, characterized by abstraction and repetition, which rejected the singularity of the masterwork and rearranged sculptural form to be contingent upon the way the body moved around it in space. The catalogue begins in the immediate post-war era, with the first section spanning the late 1950s through the 1950s. Featuring historically important predecessors including Ruth Asawa, Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Claire Falkenstein and Louise Nevelson, this section examines abstraction based on the human figure and the influence of the unconscious. The second section covers the decades of the 1960s and 1970s, and includes Magdalena Abakanowicz, Lynda Benglis, Heidi Bucher, Gego, François Grossen, Eva Hesse, Sheila Hicks, Marisa Merz, Mira Schendel, Michelle Stuart, Hannah Wilke, and Jackie Winsor, a generation of post-minimalist artists who ignited a revolution in their use of process-oriented materials and methods. In the 1980s and 1990s, the period explored in the third section, artists Phyllida Barlow, Isa Genzken, Cristina Iglesias, Liz Larner, Anna Maria Maiolino, Senga Nengudi, and Ursula von Rydingsvard moved beyond singular, three-dimensional objects toward architectonic works characterized by repetition, structure, and design. The final section is comprised of post-2000 works by artists Karla Black, Abigail DeVille, Sonia Gomes, Rachel Khedoori, Lara Schnitger, Shinique Smith, and Jessica Stockholder, artists who create installation-based environments, embracing domestic materials and craft as an embedded discourse.

Subversive Ceramics

Author: Claudia Clare
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781474257961
Size: 17.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 84

A Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2016 Satire has been used in ceramic production for centuries. Historically, it occurred as a slogan or proverb written into the ceramic surface; as pictorial surface imagery; or as a satirical figurine. The use of satire in contemporary ceramics is a rapidly evolving trend, with many artists subverting or otherwise rethinking familiar historic forms to make a political point. Claudia Clare examines the relationship between ceramics, social politics, and political movements and the way both organisations and individual artists have used pots - predominantly domestic objects - to agitate among the masses or simply express their ideas. Ninety colour illustrations of various subversive, satirical and campaigning works illustrate her arguments and enliven debate. Claudia Clare explores work by artists from twenty-one different countries, from 500 BC to the present day. These range range from the French artist Honoré Daumier and the enslaved African-American potter David Drake to contemporary artists including Lubaina Himid, Virgil Ortiz and Shlomit Bauman, whose work and the means of its production has addressed or commented upon issues such as disputed homelands, identify, race, gender and colonialism.

Get Out Of My Room

Author: Jason Reid
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226409351
Size: 14.91 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 18

Teenage life is tough. You’re at the mercy of parents, teachers, and siblings, all of whom insist on continuing to treat you like a kid and refuse to leave you alone. So what do you do when it all gets to be too much? You retreat to your room (and maybe slam the door). Even in our era of Snapchat and hoverboards, bedrooms remain a key part of teenage life, one of the only areas where a teen can exert control and find some privacy. And while these separate bedrooms only became commonplace after World War II, the idea of the teen bedroom has been around for a long time. With Get Out of My Room!, Jason Reid digs into the deep historical roots of the teen bedroom and its surprising cultural power. He starts in the first half of the nineteenth century, when urban-dwelling middle-class families began to consider offering teens their own spaces in the home, and he traces that concept through subsequent decades, as social, economic, cultural, and demographic changes caused it to become more widespread. Along the way, Reid shows us how the teen bedroom, with its stuffed animals, movie posters, AM radios, and other trappings of youthful identity, reflected the growing involvement of young people in American popular culture, and also how teens and parents, in the shadow of ongoing social changes, continually negotiated the boundaries of this intensely personal space. Richly detailed and full of surprising stories and insights, Get Out of My Room! is sure to offer insight and entertainment to anyone with wistful memories of their teenage years. (But little brothers should definitely keep out.)

Critical Craft

Author: Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781472594884
Size: 14.25 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 47

From Oaxacan wood carvings to dessert kitchens in provincial France, Critical Craft presents thirteen ethnographies which examine what defines and makes 'craft' in a wide variety of practices from around the world. Challenging the conventional understanding of craft as a survival, a revival, or something that resists capitalism, the book turns instead to the designers, DIY enthusiasts, traditional artisans, and technical programmers who consider their labor to be craft, in order to comprehend how they make sense of it. The authors' ethnographic studies focus on the individuals and communities who claim a practice as their own, bypassing the question of craft survival to ask how and why activities termed craft are mobilized and reproduced. Moving beyond regional studies of heritage artisanship, the authors suggest that ideas of craft are by definition part of a larger cosmopolitan dialogue of power and identity. By paying careful attention to these sometimes conflicting voices, this collection shows that there is great flexibility in terms of which activities are labelled 'craft'. In fact, there are many related ideas of craft and these shape distinct engagements with materials, people, and the economy. Case studies from countries including Mexico, Nigeria, India, Taiwan, the Philippines, and France draw together evidence based on linguistics, microsociology, and participant observation to explore the shifting terrain on which those engaged in craft are operating. What emerges is a fascinating picture which shows how claims about craft are an integral part of contemporary global change.