Massacre Of The Dreamers

Author: Ana Castillo
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826353597
Size: 15.57 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights This new edition of an immensely influential book gives voice to Mexic Amerindian women silenced for hundreds of years by the dual censorship of being female and indigenous. Castillo replaced the term “Chicana feminism” with “Xicanisma” to include mestiza women on both sides of the border. In history, myth, interviews, and ethnography Castillo revisits her reflections on Chicana activism, spiritual practices, sexual attitudes, artistic ideology, labor struggles, and education-related battles. Her book remains a compelling document, enhanced here with a new afterword that reexamines the significance of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

Massacre Of The Dreamers

Author: Ana Castillo
Publisher: Plume Books
ISBN: STANFORD:36105017588398
Size: 19.87 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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f the Dreamers points out the omissions and challenges the misconceptions of a society that recognizes race relations as primarily a black-and-white issue. Castillo's essays analyze the 500-year-old history of Mexican and Amerindian women in this country and document the ongoing political and emotional struggles of their descendants.

Black Dove

Author: Ana Castillo
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY
ISBN: 9781558619241
Size: 15.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Growing up as the intellectually spirited daughter of a Mexican Indian immigrant family during the 1970s, Castillo defied convention as a writer and a feminist. A generation later, her mother's crooning mariachi lyrics resonate once again. Castillo—now an established Chicana novelist, playwright, and scholar—witnesses her own son's spiraling adulthood and eventual incarceration. Standing in the stifling courtroom, Castillo describes a scene that could be any mother's worst nightmare. But in a country of glaring and stacked statistics, it is a nightmare especially reserved for mothers like her: the inner-city mothers, the single mothers, the mothers of brown sons. Black Dove: Mamá, Mi'jo, and Me looks at what it means to be a single, brown, feminist parent in a world of mass incarceration, racial profiling, and police brutality. Through startling humor and love, Castillo weaves intergenerational stories traveling from Mexico City to Chicago. And in doing so, she narrates some of America's most heated political debates and urgent social injustices through the oft-neglected lens of motherhood and family.

Latino A Thought

Author: Francisco H. Vázquez
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742568881
Size: 20.21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Latino/a Thought brings together the most important writings that shape Latino consciousness, culture, and activism today. This historical anthology is unique in its presentation of cross cultural writings—especially from Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban writers and political documents—that shape the ideology and experience of U.S. Latinos. Students can read, first hand, the works or authors who most shaped their cultural heritage. They are guided by vivid introductions that set each article or document in its historical context and describe its relevance today. The writings touch on many themes, but are guided by this book's concern for a quest for public citizenship among all Latino populations and a better understanding of racialized populations in the U.S. today.

A Xicana Codex Of Changing Consciousness

Author: Cherríe Moraga
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822349778
Size: 14.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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DIVCollection of essays and poems that address the challenges of being a Chicana, a lesbian, and a feminist in the changing world of the twenty-first century./div

Light In The Dark Luz En Lo Oscuro

Author: Gloria Anzaldúa
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822375036
Size: 12.58 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Written during the last decade of her life, Light in the Dark represents the culmination of Gloria E. Anzaldúa's mature thought and the most comprehensive presentation of her philosophy. Throughout, Anzaldúa weaves personal narratives into deeply engaging theoretical readings to comment on numerous contemporary issues—including the September 11 attacks, neocolonial practices in the art world, and coalitional politics. She valorizes subaltern forms and methods of knowing, being, and creating that have been marginalized by Western thought, and theorizes her writing process as a fully embodied artistic and political practice. Resituating Anzaldúa's work within Continental philosophy and new materialism, Light in the Dark takes Anzaldúan scholarship in new directions.